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Rolls-Royce successfully tested a hydrogen-powered jet engine last week

They are in an early phase of development and plan to study how hydrogen combustion works, how it can be controlled and identify other areas that need more exploration.

As of now, it looks like the only modification needed is a “relatively straightforward modification of the fuel injector itself”. A redesign of the combustion chamber will probably not be necessary.

It was a ground test, using a modified Rolls-Royce AE2100-A regional aircraft engine. Very soon they will also run further tests using a Pearl 15 business jet engine:

Photo: Rolls-Royce

For this test, they used green hydrogen generated by wind and tidal power.

Read more about this here.  https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/rolls-royce-successfully-tests-hydrogen-powered-jet-engine-2022-11-28/

Photo: Rolls-Royce

For this test, they used green hydrogen generated by wind and tidal power.

Read more about this here.  https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/rolls-royce-successfully-tests-hydrogen-powered-jet-engine-2022-11-28/

Only a couple days later Airbus revealed that they are developing a hydrogen-powered fuel cell engine. More about this here. https://www.airbus.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2022-11-airbus-reveals-hydrogen-powered-zero-emission-engine

This propulsion system is being considered as one of the potential solutions to equip the Airbus ZEROe zero-emission passenger aircraft that will enter service by 2035.

Photo: Airbus

Fuel-cells generate electricity very efficiently through an electrochemical reaction, rather than via combustion. Consequently, they do not generate any CO2, NOx, and will not form contrails, definitely not long-lasting ones. As long as the hydrogen is generated as “green hydrogen”, this will lead to 100% “Net-Zero” air transport.

The plan is to test it in flight on a modified A380 starting in 2026. The engine will be mounted to the fuselage, between the wings and the A380. The ultimate goal is to have a Net-Zero airliner by 2035.

Photo: Airbus

Meanwhile, here at MySkyECO, we are on track to roll out our first Net-Zero aircraft in 2024. Admittedly, it is much smaller than what Rolls-Royce and Airbus are working. But we hope that we can contribute some findings which might be scalable for larger aircraft.

This is MySkyECO MS-1e:

Yes, it is a pure electric aircraft. And it might very well be the first Net-Zero aircraft flying with people on board. And how will it be Net-Zero?

It will be charged with electric energy generated by photovoltaic panels installed on the roof of our hangar. Our computations show that we could generate enough electricity on our hangar roof to operate the aircraft for around 17 hours – A DAY. On average. That is enough to power a small fleet of MS-1e in a flight school environment.

The investment for the solar panels and the energy storage equipment could be amortized in just a few years – considering the money saved compared to AvGas.